On Thursday, May 15th, the City of Boston Public Works Department held an open house style public meeting to  provide updates on this project.

On February 26, 2014, the project team for Connecting Historic Boston held the 25% design public hearing for the project.

On December 16, 2013, the project team for Connecting Historic Boston held an open public meeting regarding the Blackstone Block portion of the project.

On December 16, 2013, the project team for Connecting Historic Boston held an open public meeting regarding the Blackstone Block portion of the project.

blackstone image

Boston’s Blackstone Block serves as a link between Haymarket Station, Boston City Hall Plaza, Faneuil Hall, the Rose Kennedy Greenway, and the North End neighborhood. It is the historic center of Boston’s market district dating back to colonial times, when goods and produce were brought to Scottow’s Dock for local sale and distribution. The Blackstone Block represents the country’s most intact colonial era street network and was designated a Boston Landmark in 1983.

Tearsheet Blackstone Block80_Page_1

Thousands of people traverse the Blackstone Block each day as commuters to and from the Financial District and as visitors to the Freedom Trail, Faneuil Hall, and the Holocaust Memorial. The footprint of the narrow streets and lanes have remained intact for over 350 years. With the exception of the 19th century granite slabs, the current paving materials are not historically accurate and have fallen into disrepair. The lanes and back alleys are potential hidden gems but are currently dimly lit and given over to refuse, parking, and illicit behavior.  The majority of the streets and sidewalks on the Blackstone Block cannot accommodate current pedestrian use and are in need of maintenance and reconstruction. The sidewalks on Union Street, where the Freedom Trail is located, are particularly narrow and overcrowded.

Connect Historic Boston proposes that the  alleys and streets within the Block will be reconstructed and revitalized to encourage people to explore the colonial lanes that criss-cross the Block and provide access to Creek Square. Investing in the materials along the streets and sidewalks in the Blackstone Block will improve the vitality of development opportunities in the vicinity, discourage unwanted uses, and help draw visitors through the entire Block.  For more information about the proposed Blackstone Block shared street, please see our fact sheet.

Appendix Blackstone Block

Connect Historic Boston is funded through a TIGER grant from U.S. DOT, administered by the Federal Highway Administration.